John Concelye

about 1734–
Bushwick, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States

The Life of John

When John Concelye was born about 1734, in Bushwick, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States, his father, Pieter Concelye, was 46 and his mother, Sarah Consellie Miller, was 39. He married Rachel Carr in 1781.

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Family Time Line

John Concelye
1734–
Rachel Carr
1755–
Marriage: 1781

Spouse and Children

MARRIAGE
1781

Parents and Siblings

siblings

(8)

+3 More Children

World Events (6)

1776

Age 42

Thomas Jefferson's American Declaration of Independence endorsed by Congress. Colonies declare independence.
1776 · The Battle of Brooklyn, the Largest Battle in the American Revolutionary War

Age 42

After the British left Boston, George Washington correctly anticipated an invasion of New York City and split forces between Brooklyn and Manhattan. The morning of August 27, 1776, the British advanced toward the marshy American camp. American General, William Alexander, Lord Sterling, led 400 Maryland soldiers against thousands of British troops led by General Charles Cornwallis. The “Maryland 400” were unable to defeat such numbers and surrendered. The British killed and captured over one thousand Americans, however, they failed to capture Washington and his army. Allowing Washington to escape changed the course of American history. After occupying Brooklyn for seven years, the British surrendered in 1783. The Maryland Monument, erected in 1895, now stands in Brooklyn in honor of the “Maryland 400” who fought that day. A quote by George Washington on the monument reads, “Good God! What brave fellows I must this day lose.” The loss of this battle helped win the Revolutionary War.
1800 · Movement to Washington D.C.

Age 66

While the growth of the new nation was exponential, the United States didn’t have permanent location to house the Government. The First capital was temporary in New York City but by the second term of George Washington the Capital moved to Philadelphia for the following 10 years. Ultimately during the Presidency of John Adams, the Capital found a permanent home in the District of Columbia.

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